Read More About Charley

“Adventures of Wells Fargo, The.”  Internet. Retrieved 19 March 2008. 
          https://www.wellsfargo.com/about/history/adventure/since_1852.

Banning, Captain William, and George Hugh Banning.  Six Horses.  New York: The Century
          Co, 1930.

Beal, Richard.  “Highway 17 Stage Coach Lines & Charley Parkhurst.”  Retrieved 17
          December 2002.  http://www.beal-net.com/hwy17/coaches.html

Brennan, Irene J.  “Charley’s Secret: Old Charley Parkhurst was a Top Whip on the Pioneer
          Stage Line Across the Sierra.”  The Nevadan.  24 February 1974.

“Charley Parkhurst a Woman.” (Obituary)  Santa Cruz Sentinel.  January 3, 1880.

Concord Coaches Built by Abbot-Downing of Concord NH:
          http://theconcordcoach.tripod.com/abbotdowning/

Concord Coach Society: http://theconcordcoach.tripod.com/

Curtis, Mabel Rowe.  The Coachman was a Lady: The Story of the Life of Charley Parkhurst
          Watsonville, CA: The Pajaro Valley Historical Association, 1959.

Hall, Daniel M.  “The Strange Life and Times of Charley Parkhurst.”  Metro Santa Cruz.
          March 5-12, 2003. 
          http://www.metroactive.com/papers/cruz/03.05.03/charley-0310.html.

Harmon, George F.  “Letter to the Editor”  Register-Pajaronian.”  March 13, 1930.

“In the Whole History of Medicine.”  (Advertisement for Ayer’s Cherry Pectoral)  Santa Cruz
          Sentinel
.  January 3, 1880.

Independent Order of Odd Fellows.  http://www.ioof.org/.

Judd, A. N.  “The Story of ‘Charley’ Parkhurst: Recalling a Romantic Character of the Early
          Days in California.”  Letter to the editor of The Pajoronia as printed in the Santa Cruz
          Surf
.  October 5, 1917.

Leonetti, Shannon Moon.  “Charley’s Secret.”  American History.  June 1997.

Levy, Jo Ann.  “They Saw the Elephant: Women in the California Gold Rush.” Norman, OK:
          University of Oklahoma Press, 1992.

Lewis, Betty.  “The Strange Tale of Charley Parkhurst.”  Register-Pajoronian.  August 12,
          1980.

________.  “The True and Unusual Story of Charley Parkhurst.”  Register-Pajoronian
          January 24, 2002.

MacDonald, Craig.  Cockeyed Charley Parkhurst: The West’s Most Unusual Stagewhip.  Palmer
          Lake, CO: The Filter Press, 1973.

Muir, John, and Galen Rowell.  The Yosemite.  San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1989.

Olson, Jay.  “Charley’s Legend Continues to Evolve: Story of the Woman Who Lived as a
          Man Still Fascinating a Century Later.”  The Mid County Post.  June 20, 2000 – July 3,
          2000.

Øydegaard, Floyd D. P.  “She Was a Man!”  Shadows of the Past.  Retrieved 17 December
          2002.  http://www.sptddog.com/sotp/Parkhurst.html.

“San Francisco Gold Rush Chronology 1850-1851.”  The Virtual Museum of the City of San
          Francisco.
Internet. Retrieved 19 March 2008.
          http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist/chron2.html.

Souza, Margaret.  “History of the Santa Cruz Courthouse”  Retrieved 4 December 2007. 
          http://www.santacruzpl.org/history/arch/cthouse.shtml.

Stroth, Steve.  “County’s 100,000th Court Case a Reminder of First One.”  The Valley Press.
          November 12, 1987.  pg 13.

Author’s Note

Between the time I did my Internet research, published Charley’s Choice, and updated my website, many URL’s that I drew information from are no longer in existence. The ones contained herein were viable as of March 2008.

Many thanks go to the Pajaro Valley Historical Association, the Santa Cruz County Historical Archives, and the Santa Cruz Public Library for the information they forwarded to me upon request.

Any work of historical fiction is a work of imagination based on as much fact as can be learned, along with the legends and myths found surrounding the person, place or incident. The author takes this linear life or timeframe, and massages it to conform to established and expected literary structure, to furnish the reader with believable drama that hopefully delights the imagination and feeds the soul. With this in mind, the author hopes the reader will enjoy the story and forgive any historical gaps the reader may perceive.